NADH auto uorescence, a new metabolic biomarker for cancer stem cells: Identi cation of Vitamin C and CAPE as natural products targeting “stemness”

Bonuccelli, G, De Francesco, E, de Boer, R, Tanowitz, H and Lisanti, MP 2017, 'NADH auto uorescence, a new metabolic biomarker for cancer stem cells: Identi cation of Vitamin C and CAPE as natural products targeting “stemness”' , Oncotarget .

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Abstract

Here, we assembled a broad molecular “tool-kit” to interrogate the role of metabolic heterogeneity in the propagation of cancer stem-like cells (CSCs). First, we subjected MCF7 cells to “metabolic fractionation” by flow cytometry, using fluorescent mitochondrial probes to detect PCG1α activity, as well ROS and hydrogen-peroxide (H2O2) production; NADH levels were also monitored by auto-fluorescence. Then, the various cell populations were functionally assessed for “stem cell activity”, using the mammosphere assay (3D-spheroids). Our results indicate that a sub-population of MCF7 cells, with increased PGC1α activity, high mitochondrial ROS/H2O2 production and high NADH levels, all form mammospheres with a higher efficiency. Thus, it appears that mitochondrial oxidative stress and the anti-oxidant response both contribute to the promotion of mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative metabolism in CSCs. Further validation was provided by using specific inhibitors to target metabolic processes (the NAD+ salvage pathway, glycolysis, mitochondrial protein synthesis and OXPHOS), significantly reducing CSC propagation. As a consequence, we have now identified a variety of clinically-approved drugs (stiripentol), natural products (caffeic acid phenyl ester (CAPE), ascorbic acid, silibinin) and experimental pharmaceuticals (actinonin, FK866, 2-DG), that can be used to effectively inhibit CSC activity. We discuss the use of CAPE (derived from honey-bee propolis) and Vitamin C, as potential natural therapeutic modalities. In this context, Vitamin C was ~10 times more potent than 2-DG for the targeting of CSCs. Similarly, stiripentol was between 50 to 100 times more potent than 2-DG.

Item Type: Article
Schools: Schools > School of Environment and Life Sciences > Biomedical Research Centre
Journal or Publication Title: Oncotarget
Publisher: Impact Journals
ISSN: 1949-2553
Related URLs:
Depositing User: MP Lisanti
Date Deposited: 31 Mar 2017 15:05
Last Modified: 09 Aug 2017 06:36
URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/42060

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