Gender segregation, underemployment and subjective well-being in the UK labour market

Kamerāde, D and Richardson, H 2017, 'Gender segregation, underemployment and subjective well-being in the UK labour market' , Human Relations . (In Press)

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Abstract

This paper argues that gender segregation influences patterns of underemployment and the relationships that underemployment has with the subjective well-being of men and women. Previous studies have paid little attention to how gender segregation shapes underemployment, an increasingly prominent feature of the UK and European labour markets since the economic crisis of 2008. Using data from the UK Annual Population Surveys, this paper examines time-related underemployment: people working part-time because they cannot find a full-time job. The paper asks whether there are gender differences in underemployment trends and in the links between underemployment and subjective well-being. The results suggest that the probability of underemployment is growing at a faster rate among women rather than men and that underemployment is most common in the jobs that women are more likely to perform, namely in female-dominated occupations, the public sector, and small organisations. Underemployment is least common in male-dominated occupations and industries and in the private sector. Moreover, for employees with longer tenures, underemployment has more negative relationships with the subjective well-being of women than with that of men. These findings imply that gender segregation in labour markets is a crucial factor to consider when researching underemployment and its consequences.

Item Type: Article
Schools: Schools > School of Nursing, Midwifery, Social Work & Social Sciences > Centre for Nursing, Midwifery, Social Work & Social Sciences Research
Journal or Publication Title: Human Relations
Publisher: SAGE Publications
ISSN: 0018-7267
Depositing User: Dr D Kamerāde
Date Deposited: 08 May 2017 14:23
Last Modified: 08 Aug 2017 19:10
URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/42283

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