Perceived injustice and its impact on job outcomes : role of jealousy and self-efficacy

Khan, MA 2018, Perceived injustice and its impact on job outcomes : role of jealousy and self-efficacy , PhD thesis, University of Salford.

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Abstract

Organizational injustice remains a matter of great concern due to its adverse effects on job outcomes. Extant research devoted much attention to investigate how perceptions of injustice impact employee attitudes and behaviours, but mostly through cognitive lens. However, examining the role of emotions between injustice and job outcome relationship remained a neglected area. More importantly, most of justice research has been conducted in western social context, giving rise to suspicions about validity of earlier research findings outside the social conditions of west. Therefore, this research seeks to test the validity of earlier research findings in justice-outcome relationships in the socio-cultural context of Pakistan i.e., outside the social conditions of west. It also investigates the unexplored mediating role of commonly experienced negative emotion of jealousy between the relationship of three injustice dimensions and job outcomes such as workplace deviance, turnover intentions and job performance. This study also explores the moderating role of self-efficacy in regulating the deleterious effects of jealousy on job outcomes relationships.

This study surveyed 388 employees of a leading banking organization in Pakistan while using data from multiple sources to address the issue of common method variance. Using PLS-SEM, the findings of this study support majority of our hypotheses. The results of study show the validity of earlier research findings regarding injustice-job outcomes relationships and suggest importance role of distributive and interactional injustice in negatively influencing job outcomes such as workplace deviance, turnover intentions and job performance, whereas procedural injustice was found to negatively impact only job performance. The results of this research also show that jealousy can mediate the negative impact of distributive and interactional injustice on job outcomes such as workplace deviance, turnover intentions and job performance, but jealousy was not found to have a mediating role between procedural injustice-job outcome relationship such as workplace deviance, turnover intentions and job performance. The findings also demonstrate that self-efficacy can help in regulating the negative effects of jealousy on employee job performance, although self-efficacy is found to have a moderating role in regulating the effects of jealousy on workplace deviance with low to medium levels of jealousy experience.

The research makes several important contributions to the justice literature: first, this study tests the validity of extant research findings regarding injustice-job outcomes relationships in the socio-cultural context of Pakistan; second, this study makes first empirical investigation of how and when jealousy explicates the effects of injustice perceptions on key job outcomes; third, it suggests a mechanism to regulate the deleterious effects of jealousy on key job outcomes. The findings are finally concluded with reference to their theoretical and managerial implications.

Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
Contributors: Sahadev, S (Supervisor), Wang, J (Supervisor) and Scarf, PA (Supervisor)
Schools: Schools > Salford Business School
Depositing User: MA Khan
Date Deposited: 28 Nov 2018 15:05
Last Modified: 28 Nov 2018 15:05
URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/48769

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