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Detection of high levels of congenital transmission of toxoplasma gondii in natural urban populations of mus domesticus

Marshall, PA, Hughes, JM, Murphy, G, Williams, RH, Smith, JE, Murphy, RG and Hide, G 2004, 'Detection of high levels of congenital transmission of toxoplasma gondii in natural urban populations of mus domesticus' , Parasitology, 128 (1) , pp. 39-42.

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Abstract

The relative importance of different transmission routes of Toxoplasma gondii has been a matter for debate. This ubiquitous parasite is generally thought to be transmitted by infective oocysts excreted by the definitive host, the cat. Ingestion of undercooked meat has also been considered an important route of transmission in many mammals while congenital transmission has generally been considered relatively rare. Experimental studies demonstrate the ability of T. gondii to be transmitted congenitally, but few studies have investigated the frequency of this transmission route in natural populations. We use PCR amplification of the SAG1 gene to investigate the frequency of congenital transmission in a wild population of mice (Mus domesticus) and show that congenital transmission is occurring in 75% of pregnancies in this population. Furthermore, for infected pregnant mice, transmission occurs to at least one foetus in 100% of cases while variable penetrance of congenital infection is observed. These high levels of congenital transmission in this wild population of mice, taken together with other recent data on congenital transmission in sheep, suggests that this phenomenon might be more widespread than previously thought.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Toxoplasma gondii, mus domesticus, PCR, SAG1, congenital, transmission
Themes: Subjects / Themes > Q Science > QR Microbiology
Subjects outside of the University Themes
Schools: Colleges and Schools > College of Science & Technology
Colleges and Schools > College of Science & Technology > School of Environment and Life Sciences
Colleges and Schools > College of Science & Technology > School of Environment and Life Sciences > Ecosystems and Environment Research Centre
Journal or Publication Title: Parasitology
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Refereed: Yes
ISSN: 00311820
Depositing User: H Kenna
Date Deposited: 05 Oct 2007 12:16
Last Modified: 20 Aug 2013 15:49
URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/659

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