Breast compression across consecutive examinations among females participating in BreastScreen Norway

Waade, GG, Sebuødegård, S, Hogg, P ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6506-0827 and Hofvind, S 2018, 'Breast compression across consecutive examinations among females participating in BreastScreen Norway' , British Journal of Radiology, 91 (1090) .

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Abstract

Objectives
Breast compression is used in mammography to improve image quality and reduce radiation dose. However, optimal values for compression force are not known, and studies has found large variation in use of compression forces between breast centres and radiographers. We investigated breast compression, including compression force, compression pressure and compressed breast thickness across four consecutive full field digital mammography (FFDM) screening examinations for 25,143 subsequently screened women aged 50-69 years.
Methods
Information from women attending four consecutive screening examinations at two breast centres in BreastScreen Norway during January 2007 - March 2016 was available. We compared the changes in compression force, compression pressure and compressed breast thickness from the first to fourth consecutive screening examination, stratified by craniocaudal (CC) and mediolateral oblique (MLO) view.
Results
Compression force, compression pressure and compressed breast thickness increased relatively by 18.3%, 14.4% and 8.4% respectively, from first to fourth consecutive screening examination in CC view (p<0.001 for all). For MLO view, the values increased relatively by 12.3% for compression force, 9.9% for compression pressure and 6.9% for compressed breast thickness from first to fourth consecutive screening examination (p<0.001 for all).
Conclusions
We observed increasing values of breast compression parameters across consecutive screening examinations. Further research should investigate the effect of this variation on image quality and women’s experiences of discomfort and pain.

Item Type: Article
Schools: Schools > School of Health and Society > Centre for Health Sciences Research
Journal or Publication Title: British Journal of Radiology
Publisher: British Institute of Radiology
ISSN: 0007-1285
Related URLs:
Depositing User: P Hogg
Date Deposited: 26 Jun 2018 11:36
Last Modified: 21 Jun 2019 08:00
URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/47485

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