Investigation into the genetic diversity in toll-like receptors 2 and 4 in the European badger Meles meles

Whiteoak, AM, Ideozu, J, Alkathiry, HA, Tomlinson, AJ, Delahay, RJ, Cowen, S, Mullineaux, E, Gormley, E, Birtles, RJ ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4216-5044, Lun, Z-R and Hide, G ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-3608-0175 2018, 'Investigation into the genetic diversity in toll-like receptors 2 and 4 in the European badger Meles meles' , Research in Veterinary Science, 119 , pp. 228-231.

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Abstract

The Toll-like receptor (TLR) genes are a conserved family of genes central to the innate immune response to pathogen infection. They encode receptor proteins, recognise pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and trigger initial immune responses. In some host-pathogen systems, it is reported that genetic differences, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), associate with disease resistance or susceptibility. Little is known about TLR gene diversity in the European badger (Meles meles). We collected DNA from UK badgers, carried out PCR amplification of the badger TLR2 gene and exon 3 of TLR4 and determined DNA sequences for individual badgers for TLR2 (n=61) and TLR4 exon 3 (n=59). No polymorphism was observed in TLR4. Three TLR2 amino acid haplotype variants were found. Ninety five percent of badgers were homozygous for one common haplotype (H1), the remaining three badgers had genotypes H1/H3, H1/H2 and H2/H2. By broad comparison with other species, diversity in TLR genes in badgers seems low. This could be due to a relatively localised sampling or inherent low genetic diversity. Further studies are required to assess the generality of the low observed diversity and the relevance to the immunological status of badgers.

Item Type: Article
Schools: Schools > School of Environment and Life Sciences > Biomedical Research Centre
Schools > School of Environment and Life Sciences > Ecosystems and Environment Research Centre
Journal or Publication Title: Research in Veterinary Science
Publisher: Elsevier
ISSN: 0034-5288
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Professor Geoff Hide
Date Deposited: 27 Jul 2018 09:08
Last Modified: 30 Jun 2019 02:30
URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/47924

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