Active bacterioplankton community response to dissolved ‘free’ deoxyribonucleic acid (dDNA) in surface coastal marine waters

Taylor, JD ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-0095-0869, Bird, KE, Widdicome, CE and Cunliffe, M 2018, 'Active bacterioplankton community response to dissolved ‘free’ deoxyribonucleic acid (dDNA) in surface coastal marine waters' , FEMS Microbiology Ecology, 94 (10) .

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Abstract

Seawater contains dissolved ‘free’ DNA (dDNA) that is part of a larger <0.2 μm pool of DNA (D-DNA) including viruses and uncharacterised bound DNA. Previous studies have shown that bacterioplankton readily degrade dDNA and culture-based approaches have identified several potential dDNA-utilising taxa. This study characterised the seasonal variation in D-DNA concentrations at Station L4, a coastal marine observatory in the Western English Channel, and linked changes in concentration to cognate physicochemical and biological factors. The impact of dDNA addition on active bacterioplankton communities at Station L4 was then determined using 16S rRNA high-throughput sequencing and RNA Stable Isotope Probing (RNA SIP) with 13C-labelled diatom-derived dDNA. Compared to other major bacterioplankton orders, the Rhodobacterales actively responded to dDNA additions in amended microcosms and RNA SIP identified two Rhodobacterales populations most closely associated with the genera Halocynthiibacter and Sulfitobacter that assimilated the 13C-labelled dDNA. Here we demonstrate that dDNA is a source of dissolved organic carbon for some members of the major bacterioplankton group the Marine Roseobacter Clade. This study enhances our understanding of roles of specific bacterioplankton taxa in dissolved organic matter cycling in coastal waters with potential implications for nitrogen and phosphorus regeneration processes.

Item Type: Article
Schools: Schools > School of Environment and Life Sciences > Ecosystems and Environment Research Centre
Journal or Publication Title: FEMS Microbiology Ecology
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISSN: 0168-6496
Related URLs:
Depositing User: JD Taylor
Date Deposited: 30 Jul 2018 10:19
Last Modified: 13 Jul 2019 08:00
URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/47948

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