Diet in the driving seat: natural diet-immunity-microbiome interactions in wild fish

Friberg, IM, Taylor, JD ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-0095-0869 and Jackson, JA ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-0330-5478 2019, 'Diet in the driving seat: natural diet-immunity-microbiome interactions in wild fish' , Frontiers in Immunology, 10 (243) .

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Abstract

Natural interactions between the diet, microbiome and immunity are largely unstudied. Here we employ wild three-spined sticklebacks as a model, combining field observations with complementary experimental manipulations of diet designed to mimic seasonal variation in the wild. We clearly demonstrate that season-specific diets are a powerful causal driver of major systemic immunophenotypic variation. This effect occurred largely independently of the bulk composition of the bacterial microbiome (which was also driven by season and diet) and of host condition, demonstrating neither of these, per se, constrain immune allocation in healthy individuals. Nonetheless, through observations in multiple anatomical compartments, differentially exposed to the direct effects of food and immunity, we found evidence of immune-driven control of bacterial community composition in mucus layers. This points to the interactive nature of the host-microbiome relationship, and is the first time, to our knowledge, that this causal chain (diet → immunity → microbiome) has been demonstrated in wild vertebrates. Microbiome effects on immunity were not excluded and, importantly, we identified outgrowth of potentially pathogenic bacteria (especially mycolic-acid producing corynebacteria) as a consequence of the more animal-protein-rich summertime diet. This may provide part of the ultimate explanation (and possibly a proximal cue) for the dramatic immune re-adjustments that we saw in response to diet change.

Item Type: Article
Schools: Schools > School of Environment and Life Sciences > Ecosystems and Environment Research Centre
Journal or Publication Title: Frontiers in Immunology
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
ISSN: 1664-3224
Related URLs:
Funders: Leverhulme Trust
Depositing User: USIR Admin
Date Deposited: 28 Jan 2019 13:39
Last Modified: 13 Sep 2019 10:36
URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/49905

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