Comparing the end to end latency of an immersive collaborative environment and a video conference

Roberts, DJ ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-9257-433X, Duckworth, TW, Moore, CM, Wolff, R and O'Hare, JJ ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5209-7754 2009, 'Comparing the end to end latency of an immersive collaborative environment and a video conference' , in: 2009 13th IEEE/ACM International Symposium on Distributed Simulation and Real Time Applications , IEEE.

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Abstract

Latency in a communication system can result in confusing a conversation through loss of causality as people exchange verbal and non-verbal nuances. This paper compares true end-to-end latencies across an immersive virtual environment and a video conference link using the same approach to measure both. Our approach is to measure end-to-end latency through filming the movements of a participant and their remote representation through synchronised cameras. We also compare contemporary and traditional immersive display and capture devices, whilst also measuring event latency taken from log files. We compare an immersive collaborative virtual environment to a video conference as both attempt to reproduce different aspects of the face-to- face meeting, the former favouring appearance and the latter attention. Results inform not only the designers of both approaches but also set the requirements for future developments for 3D video which has the potential to faithfully reproduce both appearance and attention.

Item Type: Book Section
Schools: Schools > School of Computing, Science and Engineering > Salford Innovation Research Centre (SIRC)
Publisher: IEEE
ISBN: 9780769538686
Funders: Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC)
Depositing User: JJ O'Hare
Date Deposited: 20 Mar 2019 15:41
Last Modified: 20 Mar 2019 15:45
URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/50581

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