Does tenure matter for occupant experiences of low-energy housing?

Moore, T, Sherriff, GA ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-3420-3477, Whaley, DM and Berry, SR 2019, Does tenure matter for occupant experiences of low-energy housing? , in: 10th International Conference in Sustainability on Energy and Buildings (SEB’18), 24th-26th June 2018, Gold Coast, Australia.

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Abstract

International policy settings are looking toward low-energy and near zero-energy homes as a solution to address environmental impacts, particularly anthropogenic climate change. There is increasing research evaluating sus-tainable housing developments from a technical and occupant perspective. One of the key determinants of household energy use is tenure. However, there is limited research which has looked at if tenure impacts on how oc-cupants experience low-energy homes. This paper contributes to the litera-ture by exploring three low-energy housing developments and exploring the role of tenure in relation to how the households experience the dwellings. The case studies demonstrate that social housing tenants have frustrations with a lack of control over what they could, or could not, do to their low-energy dwellings, in comparison to owner-occupier housing.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)
Schools: Schools > School of Health and Society > Centre for Applied Research in Health, Welfare and Policy
Journal or Publication Title: Smart Innovation, Systems and Technologies
Publisher: Springer
Series Name: Smart Innovation, Systems and Technologies
ISBN: 9783030042929; 9783030042936
ISSN: 2190-3018
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Dr Graeme Sherriff
Date Deposited: 29 Mar 2019 14:38
Last Modified: 01 Dec 2019 02:30
URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/50790

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