Low-energy housing : are we asking the right questions?

Berry, S, Moore, T, Sherriff, GA ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-3420-3477 and Whaley, D 2018, Low-energy housing : are we asking the right questions? , in: 10th International Conference in Sustainability on Energy and Buildings (SEB’18).

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Abstract

Purpose-built low-energy homes have been the subject of policy and researcher scrutiny for many years, and there is plenty of evidence that they deliver substantial energy and carbon emission savings. But are these the best metrics to assess their benefits? What do the occupants think are the most important aspects of living in low-energy and near net zero energy homes? This paper investigates the stories told by households living in purpose-built low-energy homes in the UK, and examines the user experiences that are most important to them. What we find is that the user experience is highly personal, is strongly linked to health and wellbeing experiences, and is focussed around family outcomes rather than rather abstract energy or environmental outcomes. This research has led to the conclusion that we may be asking the wrong questions about purpose-built low-energy homes, and using the wrong metrics to assess the benefits.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (UNSPECIFIED)
Schools: Schools > School of Health and Society > Centre for Applied Research in Health, Welfare and Policy
Journal or Publication Title: Smart Innovation, Systems and Technologies
Publisher: Springer
Series Name: Smart Innovation, Systems and Technologies
ISBN: 9783030042929
ISSN: 2190-3018
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Dr Graeme Sherriff
Date Deposited: 16 Apr 2019 11:21
Last Modified: 01 Dec 2019 02:30
URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/50791

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