Echinococcosis transmission on the Tibetan Plateau

Craig, PS, Giraudoux, P, Wang, ZH and Wang, Q 2019, 'Echinococcosis transmission on the Tibetan Plateau' , Advances in Parasitology, 104 , pp. 165-246.

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Abstract

Since the mid-1990s detailed studies and field investigations on the Tibetan Plateau have revealed human echinococcosis to be an under-reported major public health problem, particularly in the dominant pastoral communities in the eastern and central regions. Human prevalence surveys showed that cystic echinococcosis (CE, caused by Echinococcus granulosus) and alveolar echinococcosis (AE, caused by Echinococcus multilocularis) are co-endemic with higher burdens of each disease than other endemic world regions. Epidemiological investigations identified some major risk factors for human CE and AE including dog ownership, husbandry practices and landscape features. Dogs appear to be the major zoonotic reservoir for both E. granulosus and E. multilocularis, but the latter is also transmitted in complex wildlife cycles. Small mammal assemblages especially of vole and pika species thrive on the Plateau and contribute to patterns of E. multilocularis transmission which are influenced by landscape characteristics and anthropogenic factors. Tibetan foxes are a principal definitive host for both E. multilocularis and E. shiquicus. In 2006 a national echinococcosis control programme was initiated in Tibetan communities in northwest Sichuan Province and rolled out to all of western China by 2010, and included improved surveillance (and treatment access) of human disease and regular deworming of dogs with annual copro-testing. Control of echinococcosis in Tibetan pastoral communities poses a difficult challenge for delivery and sustainability.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: ISBN: 978-0-12-817716-7
Uncontrolled Keywords: Altitude, Alveolar, Cystic, Disease control, Echinococcosis, Epidemiology, Health, Surveillance, Tibetan, Transmission ecology
Schools: Schools > School of Environment and Life Sciences
Journal or Publication Title: Advances in Parasitology
Publisher: Elsevier
ISSN: 2163-6079
SWORD Depositor: Publications Router
Depositing User: Publications Router
Date Deposited: 13 May 2019 08:09
Last Modified: 13 May 2019 08:09
URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/51303

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