Evaluation of the effects of prescribing gait complexity using several fluctuating timing imperatives

Kiriella, J, Di Bacco, V, Hollands, K ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-3691-9532 and Gage, W 2019, 'Evaluation of the effects of prescribing gait complexity using several fluctuating timing imperatives' , Journal of Motor Behavior , pp. 1-8.

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Abstract

Variability in the timing of walking patterns has a complex mathematical structure (fractality). Fractality of gait can reflect health,so practicing walking with specific temporal coordination could be helpful for various groups at high risk of falls. However, the degreeto which gait fractalitycan be‘prescribed’using differentauditory stimuli is yet to be elucidated. This study evaluated the use of several fluctuating timing imperatives on the consistency of ‘prescribing’gait complexity in healthy individuals. 14healthy young adults cuedtimingof heel contactto anfractal auditory stimuliacross four conditions(uncued, white noise, pinknoise, and red noise)administered across three sessions(session 1, session 2, and session 3), with each experimentaltrial repeated twice within each session.Fractality differed based on the walking condition while no effect of sessionwas revealed. The results of this study suggest gait fractality adapts to various fractalstimuliand thatfractalitycan beconsistentlyprescribed in a desired direction withina group of healthy young individuals.

Item Type: Article
Schools: Schools > School of Health and Society > Centre for Health Sciences Research
Journal or Publication Title: Journal of Motor Behavior
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISSN: 0022-2895
Related URLs:
Depositing User: K Hollands
Date Deposited: 19 Aug 2019 13:33
Last Modified: 23 Jan 2020 11:00
URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/52138

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