Contribution of eccentric strength to cutting performance in female soccer players

Jones, PA ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-3295-7670, Dos'Santos, T, McMahon, JJ ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9952-7846 and Graham-Smith, P 2019, 'Contribution of eccentric strength to cutting performance in female soccer players' , Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research .

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Abstract

The aim of this study was to examine the contribution of eccentric strength to performance of a 70-90° cutting task (CUT) (time to complete: 5 m approach, 70-90° cut, 3 m exit). Nineteen female soccer players (mean ± SD age, height and mass; 21.6 ± 4.4 years, 1.67 ± 0.07 m and 60.5 ± 6.1 kg) from the top two tiers of English women’s soccer participated in the study. Each player performed 6 trials of the CUT task whereby three-dimensional motion data from 10 Qualisys pro-reflex cameras (240 Hz) and ground reaction forces from two AMTI force platforms (1200 Hz) were collected. Relative eccentric knee extensor (ECC-KE) and flexor peak moments (ECC-KF) were collected from both limbs at 60°·s-1 using a Kin Com isokinetic dynamometer. Hierarchical multiple regression revealed that minimum center of mass (CM) and approach velocities (CM velocity at touchdown of penultimate foot contact) could explain 82% (79% adjusted) of the variation in CUT completion time (F(1,16) = 36.086, P < 0.0001). ECC-KE was significantly (P < 0.05) moderately associated (R ≥ 0.610) with velocities at key instances during the CUT. High (upper 50th 14 percentile) ECC-KE individuals (n = 9) had significantly (P ≤ 0.01; d ≥ 1.34) greater velocities at key instances during the CUT. The findings suggest that individuals with higher ECC-KE produce faster CUT performance, by approaching with greater velocity and maintaining a higher velocity during penultimate and final contact, as they are better able to tolerate the larger loads associated with a faster approach.

Item Type: Article
Schools: Schools > School of Health and Society > Centre for Health Sciences Research
Journal or Publication Title: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research
Publisher: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
ISSN: 1064-8011
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Dr Paul Anthony Jones
Date Deposited: 30 Sep 2019 10:56
Last Modified: 28 Nov 2020 02:30
URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/52533

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