Detection and description of pulmonary nodules through 2D and 3D clustering

AL-FUNJAN, A 2019, Detection and description of pulmonary nodules through 2D and 3D clustering , PhD thesis, University of Salford.

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Abstract

Precise 3D automated detection, description and classification of pulmonary nodules offer the potential for early diagnosis of cancer and greater efficiency in the reading of computerised tomography (CT) images. CT scan centres are currently experiencing high loads and experts shortage, especially in developing countries such as Iraq where the results of the current research will be used. This motivates the researchers to address these problems and challenges by developing automated processes for the early detection and efficient description of cancer cases. This research attempts to reduce workloads, enhance the patient throughput and improve the diagnosis performance. To achieve this goal, the study selects techniques for segmentation, classification, detection and implements the best candidates alongside a novel automated approach. Techniques for each stage in the process are quantitatively evaluated to select the best performance against standard data for lung cancer. In addition, the ideal approach is identified by comparing them against other works in detecting and describing pulmonary nodules. This work detects and describes the nodules and their characteristics in several stages: automated lung segmentation from the background, automated 2D and 3D clustering of vessels and nodules, applying shape and textures features, classification and automatic measurement of nodule characteristics. This work is tested on standard CT lung image data and shows promising results, matching or close to experts’ diagnosis in the nodules number and their features (size/volume, location) and in terms the accuracy and automation. It also achieved a classification accuracy of 98% and efficient results in measuring the nodules’ volume automatically.

Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
Schools: Schools > School of Computing, Science and Engineering
Depositing User: AMERA Al-funjan
Date Deposited: 12 Nov 2019 09:35
Last Modified: 12 Nov 2019 09:35
URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/52800

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