Managers' positive gossip makes subordinates feeling better

Chang, K ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-5689-7780 and Kuo, CC 2019, Managers' positive gossip makes subordinates feeling better , in: 32nd International Congress of Psychology, 19th-24th July 2020, Prague.

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Abstract

Every story has two sides, so does gossip. Unlike prior studies which condemn gossip, our research analyses whether managers’ gossip benefits subordinates. Our view is, positive gossip contains positive meaning, implying a sense of positiveness and recognition. Based on the commitment theory, we hypothesize that managers’ positive gossip acts as commitment facilitator, providing a sense of recognition to subordinates, and that subordinates appreciate such recognition by showing commitment towards their managers. To collect research data, anonymous questionnaires are distributed to 117 managers and 201 subordinates from five industries in Taiwan. Research hypotheses are examined via bootstrapping and structural equation modelling techniques. Research findings first affirm the aforementioned hypotheses. Due to the influence of commitment, subordinates perceive more well-being, team empowerment and job embeddedness. Interestingly, managers’ negative gossip does not decrease or increase subordinates’ commitment towards managers. Our research is the first of its kind to investigate why managers’ gossip acts as commitment facilitator, with statistical analysis and explanation. Research findings have contributed to the literature by explaining gossip valence and its implication on subordinates. Such knowledge also helps to search for continuous improvement of employee performance and reduce the bias associated with workplace gossip.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)
Schools: Schools > Salford Business School > Salford Business School Research Centre
Journal or Publication Title: 32nd International Congress of Psychology
Depositing User: Professor Kirk Chang
Date Deposited: 28 Oct 2019 09:45
Last Modified: 25 Jul 2020 02:30
URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/52829

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