A single-arm, non-randomized investigation into the short-term effects and follow up of a 4-week lower limb exercise programme on kinesiophobia in individuals with knee osteoarthritis

Molyneux, J ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5242-185X, Herrington, LC ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4732-1955, Riley, B and Jones, R ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5242-185X 2020, 'A single-arm, non-randomized investigation into the short-term effects and follow up of a 4-week lower limb exercise programme on kinesiophobia in individuals with knee osteoarthritis' , Physiotherapy Research International .

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Abstract

Objective
To investigate the short-term effects and follow-up of a 4-weeks lower limb exercise programme on kinesiophobia in individuals with knee osteoarthritis.
Design
Participants diagnosed with knee OA clinically against the American College of Rheumatology criteria (ACR) were recruited. Participants completed a 4 weeks lower limb exercise programme. Each participant completed two questionnaires, the Tampa kinesiophobia scale (TSK) and the knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS). Each measurement was completed at the baseline assessment, at session 4 of the programme, at session 8 of the programme, and 6-weeks after the exercise programme. Perceived levels of exertion (RPE) were measured after each exercise session using the modified Borg scale.
Results
Fifty-four participants took part in the study. Kinesiophobia decreased from the baseline assessment to 6-weeks after the exercise programme. KOOS pain, symptoms, sports and recreation, quality of life and activities of daily living score increased, therefore showed improvement. Correlational analysis highlighted a moderate negative correlation between the KOOS pain and kinesiophobia at baseline and 6- weeks after the exercise programme (0.44, 0.48 respectively).
Conclusions
Understanding baseline kinesiophobia scores could provide an important resource for health professionals who manage individuals with knee osteoarthritis to improve the quality of care due to the correlation with pain changes and may improve exercise related outcomes for a longer duration.

Item Type: Article
Schools: Schools > School of Health and Society > Centre for Health Sciences Research
Journal or Publication Title: Physiotherapy Research International
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN: 1358-2267
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Prof Richard Jones
Date Deposited: 14 Jan 2020 15:08
Last Modified: 03 Feb 2020 16:30
URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/56218

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