The pacing of mixed martial arts sparring bouts : a secondary investigation with new analyses of previous data to support accelerometry as a potential method of monitoring pacing

Kirk, C, Atkins, SJ ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9001-6839 and Hurst, HT 2020, 'The pacing of mixed martial arts sparring bouts : a secondary investigation with new analyses of previous data to support accelerometry as a potential method of monitoring pacing' , Human Movement, 21 (4) .

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Abstract

Purpose. Body-worn accelerometry has been shown to be reliable and used to measure the external load of mixed martial arts (MMA) via the Playerload metric. These measurements were only reported on a round-by-round basis, offering little indication of minute-by-minute load changes. Understanding these changes may provide a proxy measure of fatigue, readiness, and the onset of non-functional overreaching. It is also unclear as to what Playerload is measuring in MMA. This study was a secondary investigation of previously reported data to describe minute-by-minute changes in external load in MMA. Methods. Six male MMA competitors participated in a 3 × 5 minute sparring bout wearing a Catapult Minimax × 3, which recorded accumulated Playerload. The bouts were video-recorded. Time-motion analysis was used to determine: total active time; total inactive time; high-intensity time; low-intensity time; standing time; grounded time; striking time; non-striking time. Results. Bayesian repeated measures ANOVA found statistically relevant differences in accumulated Playerload for each minute of sparring (BF10 = 410) with no statistically relevant differences between winners and losers. Bayesian correlations revealed a direct, nearly perfect relationship between accumulated Playerload and total active time (r = 0.992, BF10 = 9,666). No other relationships between Playerload and time-motion analysis results were observed, despite Bayesian t-tests finding differences between standing time and grounded time (BF10 = 83.7), striking time and non-striking time (BF10 = 1,419). Conclusions. Playerload reflects overall active movement in MMA and measures active movement minute-by-minute changes but cannot distinguish between different modes or intensities of movement. This should be investigated further as a potential measure of fatigue and non-functional overreaching during MMA training.

Item Type: Article
Schools: Schools > School of Health and Society > Centre for Health Sciences Research
Journal or Publication Title: Human Movement
Publisher: Termedia Publishing House
ISSN: 1899-1955
Related URLs:
Depositing User: SJ Atkins
Date Deposited: 16 Jun 2020 09:41
Last Modified: 01 Jul 2020 14:00
URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/57284

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