The portion size effect : women demonstrate an awareness of eating more than intended when served larger than normal portions

Keenan, GS ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-3940-7401, Childs, L, Rogers, PJ, Hetherington, MM and Brunstrom, JM 2018, 'The portion size effect : women demonstrate an awareness of eating more than intended when served larger than normal portions' , Appetite, 126 , pp. 54-60.

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Access Information: The AAM of this article is also available to access at http://eprints.whiterose.ac.uk/130661/ and https://research-information.bris.ac.uk/en/publications/the-portion-size-effect-women-demonstrate-an-awareness-of-eating-

Abstract

Large portion sizes lead to increased intake. Some studies suggest that individuals are unaware that they consume more when served larger portions. In a between-subjects design we asked female participants (N = 48) how much pasta and tomato sauce they intended to consume for lunch prior to eating. We then provided a smaller or a larger portion of the same food and invited participants to self-serve a portion into a second bowl (same size in both conditions). After eating until comfortably full, participants were shown an image of the amount they had selected at the beginning of the meal. They were then asked whether they perceived having eaten more or less than this amount, and by how much more or less they had eaten. In total 46 responses were analysed. Of the participants who received the large portion and who ate more than intended, 77% (p = .029) correctly identified eating more. However, when participants were asked to indicate by how much they had eaten above or below their intended amount, those who ate more after receiving a larger portion underestimated their intake by 25% (p = .003). These findings suggest that greater intake from a larger portion is associated with an awareness of having eaten a large quantity combined with a failure to register the actual amount consumed (in the direction of underestimation). The latter might be attributed to an error associated with the visual estimation of volume.

Item Type: Article
Schools: Schools > School of Health Sciences
Journal or Publication Title: Appetite
Publisher: Elsevier
ISSN: 0195-6663
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Dr Greg Keenan
Date Deposited: 30 Jun 2020 12:57
Last Modified: 30 Jun 2020 13:00
URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/57477

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