Perivascular adipose tissue - an immune cell metropolis

Saxton, SN, Heagerty, AM and Withers, SB ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7021-881X 2020, 'Perivascular adipose tissue - an immune cell metropolis' , Experimental Physiology .

[img] PDF - Accepted Version
Restricted to Repository staff only until 9 July 2021.

Download (661kB) | Request a copy
Access Information: This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Saxton, S.N., Heagerty, A.M. and Withers, S.B. (2020), Perivascular adipose tissue – an immune cell metropolis. Exp Physiol., which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1113/EP087872. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions.

Abstract

What is the topic of this review? The review discusses how eosinophils can contribute to the function of perivascular adipose tissue and explores the mechanisms involved. What advances does it highlight? Understanding the communication between the cell populations which constitute perivascular adipose tissue function is important for exploring therapeutic options in the treatment of obesity-related cardiovascular complications. This article highlights that eosinophils are able to directly contribute to healthy perivascular adipose tissue function. These immune cells contribute to adrenergic signalling, nitric oxide and adiponectin dependent mechanisms in perivascular adipose tissue. Perivascular adipose tissue is a heterogenous tissue which surrounds most blood vessels in the body. This review focuses on the contribution of eosinophils located within the adipose tissue to vascular contractility. High fat diet reduces the number of these immune cells with perivascular adipose tissue, and this loss is linked with an increase in vascular contractility and hypertension. We explored the mechanisms by which eosinophils contribute to this function using genetically modified mice, ex vivo assessment of contractility and pharmacological tools. We found that eosinophils contribute to adrenergic signalling, nitric oxide and adiponectin dependent mechanisms in perivascular adipose tissue. Exploring whether manipulation of these pathways in obesity can alleviate cardiovascular complications is now important to determine whether eosinophils are a valid target for obesity-related disease. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. [Abstract copyright: This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.]

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: ** From PubMed via Jisc Publications Router **Journal IDs: eissn 1469-445X **Article IDs: pubmed: 32648363 **History: accepted 06-07-2020; submitted 24-03-2020
Schools: Schools > School of Environment and Life Sciences
Journal or Publication Title: Experimental Physiology
Publisher: Wiley
ISSN: 0958-0670
Related URLs:
SWORD Depositor: Publications Router
Depositing User: Publications Router
Date Deposited: 28 Jul 2020 14:10
Last Modified: 03 Aug 2020 07:19
URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/57696

Actions (login required)

Edit record (repository staff only) Edit record (repository staff only)

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year