Enhanced gas recovery by nitrogen injection : the effects of injection velocity during natural gas displacement in consolidated rocks

Mohammed, NUHU ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-7679-8889, Abbas, AJ ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-0709-1713, Enyi, GC ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1783-2420, Edem, DE ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4293-8198 and Suleiman, SM ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2098-8645 2020, 'Enhanced gas recovery by nitrogen injection : the effects of injection velocity during natural gas displacement in consolidated rocks' , Journal of Natural Gas Science and Engineering, 83 , p. 103513.

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Abstract

The choice of the flow velocity in EGR thus becomes important since higher injection rates could lead to premature mixing of the fluids and lower injection rates generally provide longer resident times for the fluids in contact and indirectly increases the mixing of the gases. Additionally, the medium peclet numbers mostly indicate the best injection rates that translate to a smoother displacement with a lower dispersion coefficient during the EGR process. Therefore, N2 Injection into natural gas reservoirs offers the potential to higher recovery efficiency with less mixing compared to conventional CO2 injection. The atmospheric air contained 79% of N2, making it readily available than CO2 with 400 ppm air composition. More so, N2 requires less compression ratio, which is why a lower amount of it was required to initiate much pressure in the CH4 reservoir during displacement. These made the use of N2 more economically feasible and friendly for the EGR process. A laboratory core flooding experiment was carried out to simulate the effect of injection velocity on CH4 recovery and dispersion coefficient. This was done at 40 ◦C, 1500 psig, and 0.2–1.0 ml/min injection rates. The results showed that a medium peclet number could be used to predict the best injection rate that translates to a smoother displacement with a lower dispersion coefficient during the EGR process. CH4 recovery and efficiency were highest at lower injection velocities experienced in both core samples. This could be attributed to insignificance nascent mixing observed as seen on their recorded low longitudinal dispersion coefficient results. Consequence, the experimental runs at high injection rates (0.6–1.0 ml/min) present a different scenario with lower recovery and efficiency due to their high interstitial velocities as the N2 plumes transverses into the core sample during CH4 displacement. Overall, the least methane production and efficiency were noticed in the Bandera core sample as a result of the heterogeneity effect due to the presence of higher clay contents in Bandera than Berea gray. When the capillary forces within the narrower pores in Bandera core sample were overcome, the clay particles occupied those pores thereby sealing some of the flow paths within the pore matrix. This reduces the flow channels, significantly, through which the injected N2 will flow to displace the residual CH4.

Item Type: Article
Schools: Schools > School of Computing, Science and Engineering
Journal or Publication Title: Journal of Natural Gas Science and Engineering
Publisher: Elsevier
ISSN: 1875-5100
Related URLs:
Depositing User: NUHU Mohammed
Date Deposited: 26 Aug 2020 08:19
Last Modified: 26 Aug 2020 08:19
URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/58013

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