Examining patient distress and unmet need for support across UK renal units with varying models of psychosocial care delivery : a cross-sectional survey study

Seekles, M ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7000-3624, Ormandy, P ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6951-972X and Kamerade, D ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2019-3391 2020, 'Examining patient distress and unmet need for support across UK renal units with varying models of psychosocial care delivery : a cross-sectional survey study' , BMJ Open, 10 (9) , e036931.

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Abstract

Objective: To examine in-centre haemodialysis patients’ emotional distress and need for support across UK renal units with varying models of psychosocial service provision. Design: The study used a cross-sectional survey design. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine patient distress, as captured by the Distress Thermometer, and need for support, across different renal units. Setting: Seven renal units across England, Wales and Scotland. The units were purposively selected so that varying workforce models of renal psychosocial services were represented. Participants: In total, 752 patients were on dialysis in the participating centres on the days of data collection. All adult patients, who could understand English, and with capacity (as determined by the nurse in charge), were eligible to participate in the study. The questionnaire was completed by 509 patients, resulting in an overall response rate of 67.7%. Outcome measures: The prevalence of distress and patient-reported need for support. Results: The results showed that 48.9% (95% CI 44.5 to 53.4) of respondents experienced distress. A significant association between distress and models of renal psychosocial service provision was found (χ2(6)=15.05, p=0.019). Multivariable logistic regression showed that patients in units with higher total psychosocial staffing ratios (OR 0.65 (95% CI 0.47 to 0.89); p=0.008) and specifically higher social work ratios (OR 0.49 (95% CI 0.33 to 0.74); p=0.001) were less likely to experience distress, even after controlling for demographic variables. In addition, a higher patient-reported unmet need for support was found in units where psychosocial staffing numbers are low or non-existent (χ2(6)=37.80, p<0.001). Conclusions: The novel findings emphasise a need for increased incorporation of dedicated renal psychosocial staff into the renal care pathway. Importantly, these members of staff should be able to offer support for psychological as well as practical and social care-related issues.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: ** Embargo end date: 17-09-2020 ** From BMJ via Jisc Publications Router ** Licence for this article starting on 17-09-2020: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ **Journal IDs: eissn 2044-6055 **Article IDs: publisher-id: bmjopen-2020-036931 **History: published_online 17-09-2020; published 09-2020; accepted 20-07-2020; rev-recd 11-06-2020; submitted 10-01-2020
Schools: Schools > School of Health and Society
Journal or Publication Title: BMJ Open
Publisher: BMJ Publishing Group
ISSN: 2044-6055
Related URLs:
Funders: Kidney Care UK
SWORD Depositor: Publications Router
Depositing User: Publications Router
Date Deposited: 21 Sep 2020 12:58
Last Modified: 21 Sep 2020 13:00
URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/58341

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