Urban green infrastructure size, quality and proximity and health outcomes in older populations

Cook, PA ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6435-8050, Dennis, M, Wheater, CP, James, P ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9079-3953 and Lindley, S 2020, 'Urban green infrastructure size, quality and proximity and health outcomes in older populations' , European Journal of Public Health, 30 (Sup. 5) , v88-v89.

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Access Information: This is a published abstract of a presentation given at 16th World Congress on Public Health (WCPH2020), held 12th–16th October 2020. The published version of the abstract can be accessed for free using the link above.

Abstract

Background
A city's multi-functional network of green and blue spaces has an important role underpinning the health and wellbeing of its residents. Although evidence of positive links between nature and health is plentiful, little is known about which particular aspects of green and blue spaces are most influential, and how benefits might vary between social groups and age.
Methods
We used a green infrastructure (GI) approach combining a high-resolution spatial dataset of land-cover and function with area-level demographic and socio-economic data. A comprehensive characterisation of the Greater Manchester UK city region was generated. The GI attributes were used in step-wise multi-level regression analyses to test for associations between population chronic morbidity and the functional, physical and spatial components of GI across an urban socio-demographic gradient.
Results
Individual GI attributes were significantly associated with health in all socio-demographic contexts; even when associations between health and overall green cover were non-significant. For areas with having higher proportions of older people ('older neighbourhoods'), associations were found between health and land-cover diversity, informal greenery and patch size in high income areas. In lower income areas, health was predicted by proximity to public parks and recreation land.
Conclusions
A nuanced description of greenspace in terms of quality, cover type, diversity explains more variation in population health than a single metric such as percentage green cover. People in urban neighbourhoods that have older age populations and lower income are disproportionately healthy if their neighbourhoods contain accessible, good quality public greenspace. This has implications for strategies to decrease health inequalities and inform international initiatives, such as the World Health Organisation's Age-Friendly Cities programme.
Key messages
A nuanced description of green and blue space in terms of quality, cover type, diversity explains more variation in population health than a single metric such as percentage green cover.
People in urban neighbourhoods that have older age populations and lower income are disproportionately healthy if their neighbourhoods contain accessible, good quality public greenspace.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: ** Article version: VoR ** From Crossref via Jisc Publications Router **Journal IDs: pissn 1101-1262; eissn 1464-360X **History: published_online 30-09-2020; issued 01-09-2020; published 01-09-2020 **License for this article: starting on 01-09-2020, , https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/open_access/funder_policies/chorus/standard_publication_model
Schools: Schools > School of Health and Society
Journal or Publication Title: European Journal of Public Health
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISSN: 1101-1262
Related URLs:
SWORD Depositor: Publications Router
Depositing User: Publications Router
Date Deposited: 21 Oct 2020 08:10
Last Modified: 21 Oct 2020 08:10
URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/58583

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