The experiences of myocardial infarction patients readmitted within six months of primary percutaneous coronary intervention

Iles-Smith, HM ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-0520-2694, Deaton, C, Campbell, M, Mercer, C and McGowan, L 2017, 'The experiences of myocardial infarction patients readmitted within six months of primary percutaneous coronary intervention' , Journal of Clinical Nursing, 26 (21-22) , pp. 3511-3518.

[img]
Preview
PDF - Accepted Version
Download (159kB) | Preview
Access Information: This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Iles‐Smith, H., Deaton, C., Campbell, M., Mercer, C. and McGowan, L. (2017), The experiences of myocardial infarction patients readmitted within six months of primary percutaneous coronary intervention. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 26 (21-22): 3511-3518., which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1111/jocn.13715. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions.

Abstract

Aims and objectives To explore the experiences of patients readmitted due to potential ischaemic heart disease symptoms within six months of primary percutaneous coronary intervention. Background Following myocardial infarction and primary percutaneous coronary intervention, some patients experience potential ischaemic heart disease symptoms that may lead to readmission. Symptoms may be related to cardiac ischaemia, reduced psychological health or a comorbid condition. Design A qualitative study involving semistructured, in‐depth interviews conducted once, mean 196 (50–384) days following readmission (at least six months following original ST‐elevation myocardial infarction and primary percutaneous coronary intervention). This is the qualitative part of a mixed methods study. Methods Participants were purposefully selected, and concurrent sampling, data collection and data analysis were performed. Data were organised using framework analysis; constant comparative analysis involving deduction and induction led to identification of cogent themes and subthemes. Results Twenty‐five participants (14 men, 27–79 years) experienced 1–4 readmissions; discharge diagnoses were cardiac, psychological, indeterminate, pulmonary and gastric. Three main themes emerged: (1) anxiety, uncertainty and inability to determine cause of symptoms, (2) fear of experiencing further myocardial infarction and (3) insufficient opportunity to validate self‐construction of illness. Conclusion Fear of dying or experiencing a further myocardial infarction led to patients seeking help at the time of potential ischaemic heart disease symptoms. Participants were anxious and lacked understanding regarding symptom attribution at the time of readmission and generally following their heart attack. Additionally, original heart attack symptoms were used as a comparator for future symptoms. Participants reported feeling well immediately after primary percutaneous coronary intervention but later experiencing fatigue and debilitation often linked to potential ischaemic heart disease symptoms. Relevance to clinical practice Increased education and information related to symptom attribution post‐primary percutaneous coronary intervention and postreadmission are worthy of exploration and may lead to increased understanding and reassurance for this patient group.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This output is also available at the White Rose Research Online (University of Leeds) Repository: http://eprints.whiterose.ac.uk/114965/
Schools: Schools > School of Health and Society > Centre for Health Sciences Research
Journal or Publication Title: Journal of Clinical Nursing
Publisher: Wiley
ISSN: 0962-1067
Related URLs:
Funders: Central Manchester Foundation NHS Trust, University of Manchester
Depositing User: HM Iles-Smith
Date Deposited: 20 Nov 2020 15:11
Last Modified: 20 Nov 2020 15:16
URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/58887

Actions (login required)

Edit record (repository staff only) Edit record (repository staff only)

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year