South Asian Indian patients’ perspective of the Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) interventions for depression in Primary Care : a qualitative & grounded theory analysis study

Johnson, G 2020, South Asian Indian patients’ perspective of the Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) interventions for depression in Primary Care : a qualitative & grounded theory analysis study , DProf thesis, University Of Salford.

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Abstract

Background Mental Health is paramount to personal wellbeing, building relationships and making contributions to society, (Thornicroft, Rugerri & Goldberg, 2013). With the population of the United Kingdom constantly changing over the past decades, primary care services within the National Health Service (NHS) have experienced significant challenges in adapting and modifying services to meet a wide range of needs (Serrant-Green, 2014). Poorly targeted, inappropriate interventions and ineffective organisation and delivery of services impact negatively on those at the receiving end such as the BAME group of South Asian Indians (SAIs). Study Aim The focus of this study was to explore South Asian Indians’ experiences of psychological therapies received in primary care when presenting with depression. Methods A Qualitative and Grounded theory analysis study was used, and a total of 7 South Asian Indian people participated in the study. Qualitative semi-structured interviews were conducted with the participants in the West Midlands who had experienced depression and had received CBT. Data was gathered and analysed using a Grounded theory (GT) approach (Charmaz, 2014; Corbin and Strauss, 2014; Glaser & Strauss, 1967). Findings Four unique findings emerged from the study. The critical findings in this Thesis indicate that first encounters are crucial as they determine service uptake and successful completion of treatment and dropout rates. For SAI’s, dropping out of services was a result of patients feeling considerable progression in their condition that they no longer required services. Another significant finding demonstrates that for SAI’s, accessing services can be a personal choice based on individual evaluations and perception whether the service would be beneficial. This means that SAI’s would engage in psychological therapy presuming they were “listened” to and “understood” from their individual contexts. The findings also evidence a new pedigree of patients experiencing depression who wish to be viewed as major stakeholders within IAPT decision making policies and suggested that co-production frameworks and approaches to healthcare be implemented so they may be actively involved in developing mental health policies, administration and delivering of care. Conclusion Research on the study topic of SAI and experiences of CBT psychological therapies when suffering from depression in UK Primary Care is limited. Therefore, having presented the unique findings, neither replicated from existing research, this study is original as no relevant studies which have assessed or explored SAI patients’ experiences of IAPT CBT psychological therapies for people with depression in UK Primary Care were identified in the literature to date. Key aspects from this thesis may also contribute to ongoing and necessary debates about healthcare inequities and inequalities, thereby informing policy changes and development.

Item Type: Thesis (DProf)
Contributors: Howarth, ML (Supervisor)
Schools: Schools > School of Health and Society
Depositing User: G Johnson
Date Deposited: 17 Dec 2020 13:31
Last Modified: 17 Dec 2020 13:31
URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/58985

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