The potential for cool roofs to improve the energy efficiency of single storey warehouse-type retail buildings in Australia : a simulation case study

Seifhashemi, M, Capra, B, Miller, W and Bell, J 2018, 'The potential for cool roofs to improve the energy efficiency of single storey warehouse-type retail buildings in Australia : a simulation case study' , Energy and Buildings, 158 , pp. 1393-1403.

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Abstract

Australia’s commercial building stock exceeds 134 million m2 of net lettable area, with retail buildings contributing 35% to this sector’s energy use. The energy intensity of retail buildings in hotter climates is higher than the national average, as is the energy intensity of smaller buildings (under 1500m2) that are not considered ‘high-end’ commercial properties. Little attention has been paid to improving the energy efficiency of these types of buildings through regulation (for new buildings) or through market mechanisms (for retrofitting). As many of these buildings are single storey ‘warehouse’ type buildings, their predominant heat load comes through the roof, and thus are well suited to benefit from cool roof technology. Despite this, there remains a deficiency in quantifying the benefit of such technology in the context of single-storey retail buildings in Australia. This paper reports on an experimentally validated numerical study aimed at addressing this deficiency. Results show that application of cool roof technology to a warehouse type building in a subtropical environment increases the energy efficiency by shifting space temperature towards the design set point (21-23°C), and thus reducing cooling energy demand. This study also indicates an energy saving every month with the application of cool roof, with the largest saving in hotter months and no heating penalty in cooler months. Application of cool roof technology on warehouse style buildings across Australia buildings indicates energy savings can be achieved in all broad Australian climatic zones, with the greatest energy reduction associated with tropical, subtropical and desert environments.

Item Type: Article
Schools: Schools > School of the Built Environment
Journal or Publication Title: Energy and Buildings
Publisher: Elsevier
ISSN: 0378-7788
Related URLs:
Depositing User: SM Seifhashemi
Date Deposited: 15 Jan 2021 11:14
Last Modified: 15 Jan 2021 11:15
URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/59363

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