The Strepsirrhine and Tarsier genome sequencing initiative : conservation genomics of the non-anthropoid primate

Orkin, JD, Kuderna, LFK, Gut, M, Gut, I, Horvath, J, Janiak, MC ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7759-2556, Merker, S, Kitchener, A, Pozzi, L, Zhang, GJ, Roos, C, Rogers, J, Farh, KKH and Marques-Bonet, T 2021, The Strepsirrhine and Tarsier genome sequencing initiative : conservation genomics of the non-anthropoid primate , in: 90th annual meeting of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists, 7th-28th April 2021, Online.

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

Tremendous effort has been made to study the ecology and evolution of strepsirrhines and tarsiers. However, in comparison to the anthro-poids, they remain relatively understudied. This disparity is particularly evident in the field of genomics. While the number of non-anthropoid genome studies has increased in recent years, genomic resources are only available for a small number of species. This relative dearth of information has limited the extent to which the remarkable ecological, phenotypic, and demographic diversity of these primates can be studied. As part of the Primate Sequencing Conservation Initiative, we have sequenced whole genomes from 102 individuals in 59 species (37 Lemuroidea, 17 Lorisoidea, and 5 Tarsiiformes) to high coverage (average of ~30X). The majority of these individuals are wild-born, and from species for which whole genomes have never been sequenced. Using this broad panel of genomes, we examine patterns of genetic diversity, demographic history, phylogeny, and genetic introgression, observing a wide range of variation. Secondly, we examine the role of local adaptation to eco-geographic regions of Madagascar. We also identify relationships between digestive and chemosensory genes and ecological variation. In particular, we focus our efforts on the families Lemuridae and Indriidae from which we have sequenced most commonly recognized species. We provide new insights relevant to the ecology and evolution of these understudied primates and valuable genomic resources for ongoing conservation efforts.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Poster)
Schools: Schools > School of Environment and Life Sciences
Journal or Publication Title: American Journal of Physical Anthropology
Publisher: Wiley
ISSN: 0002-9483
Related URLs:
Funders: European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme, European Research Council (ERC), European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme, Marie Skodowska Curie grant, La Caixa Foundation
Depositing User: USIR Admin
Date Deposited: 25 Mar 2021 10:29
Last Modified: 27 Aug 2021 21:51
URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/59927

Actions (login required)

Edit record (repository staff only) Edit record (repository staff only)