Incidence and risk factors for poor ankle functional recovery, and the development and progression of posttraumatic ankle osteoarthritis after significant ankle ligament injury (SALI) : the SALI cohort study protocol

Bestwick-Stevenson, T ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6148-1248, Wyatt, LA, Palmer, D, Ching, A ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-3765-2534, Kerslake, R, Coffey, F, Batt, ME and Scammell, BE 2021, 'Incidence and risk factors for poor ankle functional recovery, and the development and progression of posttraumatic ankle osteoarthritis after significant ankle ligament injury (SALI) : the SALI cohort study protocol' , BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, 22 (1) , p. 362.

[img]
Preview
PDF - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution 4.0.

Download (768kB) | Preview

Abstract

Background: Ankle sprains are one of the most common musculoskeletal injuries, accounting for up to 5% of all Emergency Department visits in the United Kingdom. Ankle injury may be associated with future ankle osteoarthritis. Up to 70% of ankle osteoarthritis cases may be associated with previous ankle injury. There is limited research regarding the association between ankle sprain and ankle osteoarthritis development. The current study aims to phenotype those who suffer significant ankle ligament injuries, identify potential risk factors for ankle injuries and subsequent poor recovery, examine why individuals may develop osteoarthritis, and what factors influence this chance. Methods: In this multicentre cohort study participants were recruited from nine Emergency Departments and two Urgent Care Centres in the United Kingdom. Participants (aged 18–70 years old) were defined as those who had suffered an isolated acute ankle sprain, which was Ottawa Ankle Rules positive, but negative for a significant ankle fracture on x-ray. Age and sex matched controls were also recruited. The controls were individuals who had not suffered a significant ankle injury, including ankle pain, function affected for more than 7 days, or the ankle caused them to report to an Emergency Department. Data is collected through a series of seven questionnaires (at baseline, 3 months, 1 year, 3 years, 5 years, 10 years, and 15 years later). The questionnaires include four sections (demographic questions; index injury, and injury history questions; functional assessment questions; and quality of life questions) and are designed to collect detailed information about the individual, their injury, potential risk factors for ankle sprains and ankle osteoarthritis, plus their medical history and any medication consumed. Discussion: The Significant Ankle Ligament Injury (SALI) study aims to add to the limited knowledge regarding which factors can predict ankle sprains, complaints, and osteoarthritis. This is important because despite ankle sprains being regarded as a benign injury that resolves quickly, residual symptoms are not uncommon months and years after the injury.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: ** From Springer Nature via Jisc Publications Router ** Licence for this article: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ **Journal IDs: eissn 1471-2474 **Article IDs: publisher-id: s12891-021-04230-8; manuscript: 4230 **History: collection 12-2021; published 17-04-2021; online 17-04-2021; accepted 07-04-2021; registration 07-04-2021; submitted 08-02-2021
Schools: Schools > School of Health and Society
Journal or Publication Title: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
Publisher: BioMed Central
ISSN: 1471-2474
Related URLs:
Funders: Versus Arthritis, Nottingham Hospitals Charity, British Association of Sport and Exercise Medicine
SWORD Depositor: Publications Router
Depositing User: Publications Router
Date Deposited: 19 Apr 2021 09:56
Last Modified: 06 Oct 2021 12:30
URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/60074

Actions (login required)

Edit record (repository staff only) Edit record (repository staff only)

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year