Systematic review of interventions to promote the performance of physical distancing behaviours during pandemics/epidemics of infectious diseases spread via aerosols or droplets

Epton, T, Ghio, D ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-0580-0205, Ballard, LM, Allen, SF, Kassianos, AP, Hewitt, R, Swainston, K, Fynn, WI, Rowland, V, Westbrook, J, Jenkinson, E, Morrow, A, McGeechan, GJ, Stanescu, S, Yousuf, A, Sharma, N, Begum, S, Karasouli, E, Scanlan, D, Shorter, GW, Arden, M, Armitage, C, O'Connor, D, Kamal, A, McBride, E, Swanson, V, Hart, J, Byrne-Davis, L, Chater, A and Drury, J 2021, Systematic review of interventions to promote the performance of physical distancing behaviours during pandemics/epidemics of infectious diseases spread via aerosols or droplets [Experiment].

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Abstract

Objectives Physical-distancing (i.e., keeping 1-2m apart when co-located) can prevent cases of infectious-diseases spread by droplets/aerosols (i.e. SARS-COV2). Distancing is a recommendation/requirement in many countries. This systematic-review aimed to determine which interventions and behaviour change techniques (BCTs) are effective in promoting adherence to physical-distancing and through which potential mechanisms of action (MOAs).
Methods Six databases were searched for studies of physical-distancing interventions. A narrative synthesis included any design that included a comparator (e.g., pre-intervention versus post-intervention; randomised controlled trial), for any population and year. Risk-of-bias was assessed using the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool. BCTs and potential MoAs were identified in each intervention..
Results Six papers of moderate/high quality indicated that distancing interventions could successfully change MoAs/behaviour. Successful BCTs (MoAs) included feedback on behaviour (e.g., motivation); information about/ salience of health consequences (e.g., beliefs about consequences) and demonstration (e.g., beliefs about capabilities) and restructuring the physical environment (e.g., environmental context and resources). The most promising interventions were proximity buzzers, directional systems and posters with loss-framed messages that demonstrated the behaviours.
Conclusions High quality RCTs that measure behaviour, have representative samples and specify/test a larger range of BCTs /MoAs are needed.

Item Type: Experiment
Schools: Schools > School of Health and Society
Related URLs:
Funders: Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC), National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Manchester Biomedical Research Centre and National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Greater Manchester Patient Safety Translational Research Centre
Depositing User: Dr Daniela Ghio
Date Deposited: 15 Jun 2021 09:22
Last Modified: 15 Jun 2021 09:22
URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/60954

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