The effects of sprint vs. resisted sled-based training; an 8-week in-season randomized control intervention in elite rugby league players

Sinclair, J ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2231-3732, Edmundson, CJ, Metcalfe, J, Bottoms, L ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4632-3764, Atkins, SJ ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9001-6839 and Bentley, I 2021, 'The effects of sprint vs. resisted sled-based training; an 8-week in-season randomized control intervention in elite rugby league players' , International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 18 (17) , e9241.

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Abstract

The aim of the current study was to examine the efficacy of resisted sled-based training compared to traditional unresisted sprint training in terms of mediating improvements in speed, agility, and power during an eight-week period of in-season training in elite rugby league players. Participants were randomly separated into either resisted sled or traditional sprint-based training groups and they completed an eight-week in-season training block with training prescribed based on the group to which they were assigned. Measures of 5 m, 10 m, and 20 m sprint times in addition to countermovement jump height and 505-agility test time were measured at baseline, four-weeks and eight-weeks. For sprint-based outcomes, although both groups improved significantly, there were no statistical differences between the two training methods. However, at the eight-week time point there were significant improvements in 505-agility test (sprint group: baseline = 2.45 and eight-weeks = 2.42 s/sled group: baseline = 2.43 and eight-weeks = 2.37 s) and countermovement jump (sprint group: baseline = 39.18 and eight-weeks = 39.49 cm/sled group: baseline = 40.43 and eight-weeks = 43.07 cm) performance in the sled training group. Therefore, the findings from this investigation may be important to strength and conditioning coaches working in an elite rugby league in that resisted sled training may represent a more effective method of sprint training prescription.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: ** From MDPI via Jisc Publications Router ** Licence for this article: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ **Journal IDs: eissn 1660-4601 **History: published 01-09-2021; accepted 27-08-2021
Schools: Schools > School of Health and Society
Journal or Publication Title: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Publisher: MDPI
ISSN: 1660-4601
Related URLs:
SWORD Depositor: Publications Router
Depositing User: Publications Router
Date Deposited: 03 Sep 2021 08:31
Last Modified: 06 Sep 2021 07:59
URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/61737

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