Mindfulness-based interventions to reduce stress and burnout in nurses : an integrative review

Armstong, J ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2547-8209 and Tume, LN ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2547-8209 2022, 'Mindfulness-based interventions to reduce stress and burnout in nurses : an integrative review' , British Journal of Mental Health Nursing, 11 (1) , pp. 1-11.

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Access Information: his document is the Accepted Manuscript version of a Published Work that appeared in final form in 11 British Journal of Mental Health Nursing, copyright © MA Healthcare, after peer review and technical editing by the publisher. To access the final edited and published work see https://doi.org/10.12968/bjmh.2020.0036

Abstract

Background With work-related stress and current COVID-19 pandemic, nurses are at heightened risk of stress and burnout. Mindfulness-based interventions (MBI) have been seen to decrease stress and burnout, yet research into the effectiveness for nursing staff is limited. This review adds to the growing body of literature surrounding mindfulness and to explore the benefit it may have for clinical professionals. Aim To review and critically appraise the evidence around the effectiveness of MBIs to help reduce stress and/or burnout in nurses working in acute hospital settings. Method An integrative review. Findings Eleven research papers were identified, all of which found a reduction in stress and burnout for nurses working in acute hospital settings. MBIs can be adapted to suit nursing schedules whilst maintaining efficacy, but uncertainties remain around the optimisation of the length and delivery of these for integration into the NHS. Conclusions This updated review found that MBIs may be an effective intervention to reduce stress and burnout in nurses working in acute settings. However, further research to establish and test a standardised MBI is required before it could be implemented into the National Health Service (NHS) settings.

Item Type: Article
Schools: Schools > School of Health and Society > Centre for Health Sciences Research
Journal or Publication Title: British Journal of Mental Health Nursing
Publisher: Mark Allen Healthcare
ISSN: 2049-5919
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Dr Lyvonne Tume
Date Deposited: 28 Oct 2021 10:34
Last Modified: 18 Feb 2022 09:45
URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/62218

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