Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder and Interviewing : a systematic review highlighting clinical and legal implications and recommendations

Gilbert, DJ ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4812-2328, Allely, CS ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-7640-9505, Mukherjee, RAS and Cook, PA ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6435-8050 2021, 'Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder and Interviewing : a systematic review highlighting clinical and legal implications and recommendations' , Behavioral Sciences & the Law . (In Press)

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Abstract

Background
Individuals with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) are estimated to be nineteen times more likely to encounter the criminal justice system (CJS) in comparison to individuals without FASD. During encounters with the CJS, investigative interviews are employed to obtain accurate information from suspects, victims, or witnesses of crime.
Methods
A systematic search using PRISMA guidelines was performed to identify empirical studies published that have explored the questioning of the FASD population within the CJS and the vulnerabilities of FASD-impacted individuals during investigative interviewing.
Results
A total of 383 studies were identified from the databases searched and seven further studies were identified from Google Scholar. After deduplication, abstract and title screening, the full text of 23 studies were assessed for inclusion and five were included in the narrative synthesis of results. Two papers were empirical studies focused on the performance of FASD-impacted individuals during investigative interviewing. While the first study found the FASD population susceptible to suggestions, the second (a case study), identified the ploys employed during investigative interviewing to obtain a confession. Three papers studied the wider vulnerabilities of FASD-impacted individuals and found diminished psycho-legal abilities, increased risk of recidivism, and biological, psychological, and social factors that render FASD -impacted individuals vulnerable to CJS encounters.
Conclusion
Despite the greater likelihood of CJS encounters, the result of this review highlights the slim evidence base useful to establish the vulnerabilities of FASD-impacted individuals within the CJS.

Item Type: Article
Schools: Schools > School of Health and Society > Centre for Health Sciences Research
Schools > School of Health and Society > Centre for Applied Research in Health, Welfare and Policy
Journal or Publication Title: Behavioral Sciences & the Law
Publisher: Wiley
ISSN: 0735-3936
Depositing User: DJ Gilbert
Date Deposited: 22 Nov 2021 08:40
Last Modified: 22 Nov 2021 08:45
URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/62381

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