A mixed methods analysis evaluating an alcohol health champion community intervention : how do newly trained champions perceive and understand their training and role?

Hargreaves, SC ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-3240-8230, Ure, CM ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5021-1947, Burns, EJ ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4611-9253, Coffey, M ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5837-5532, Audrey, S, Ardern, K and Cook, PA ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6435-8050 2022, 'A mixed methods analysis evaluating an alcohol health champion community intervention : how do newly trained champions perceive and understand their training and role?' , Health and Social Care in the Community .

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Abstract

Globally, alcohol harm is recognised as one of the greatest population risks and reducing alcohol harm is a key priority for the UK Government. The Communities in Charge of Alcohol (CICA) programme took an asset-based approach in training community members across nine areas to become alcohol health champions (AHCs); trained in how to have informal conversations about alcohol and get involved with alcohol licensing. This paper reports on the experiences of AHCs taking part in the training through the analysis of: questionnaires completed pre- and post-training (n=93) and semi-structured interviews with a purposive sample of five AHCs who had started their role. Questionnaires explored: characteristics of AHCs, perceived importance of community action around alcohol and health, and confidence in undertaking their role. Following training AHCs felt more confident to talk about alcohol harms, give brief advice and get involved in licensing decisions. Interviews explored: AHCs’ experiences of the training, barriers, and facilitators to the adoption of their role, and how they made sense of their role. Four overarching themes were identified through thematic analysis taking a framework approach: 1) perceptions of AHC training; 2) applying knowledge and skills in the AHC role; 3) barriers and facilitators to undertaking the AHC role; and 4) sustaining the AHC role. Findings highlight the challenges in establishing AHC roles can be overcome by combining the motivation of volunteers with environmental assets in a community setting: the most important personal asset being the confidence to have conversations with people about a sensitive topic, such as alcohol.

Item Type: Article
Schools: Schools > School of Health and Society
Journal or Publication Title: Health and Social Care in the Community
Publisher: Wiley
ISSN: 0966-0410
Related URLs:
Funders: National Institute for Health Research (NIHR)
Depositing User: SC Hargreaves
Date Deposited: 06 Jan 2022 13:30
Last Modified: 15 Feb 2022 16:51
URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/62662

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