Does wearing arthritis gloves help with hand pain and function? A qualitative study into patients’ views and experiences

Prior, Y ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9831-6254, Bartley, CA, Adams, J, Firth, J, Culley, J, O'Neill, T and Hammond, A ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-5266-9991 2022, 'Does wearing arthritis gloves help with hand pain and function? A qualitative study into patients’ views and experiences' , Rheumatology Advances in Practice, 6 (1) , rkac007.

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Abstract

Objectives: Arthritis gloves are frequently prescribed to people with undifferentiated inflammatory (UIA) or rheumatoid arthritis (RA), to help reduce hand pain and improve function. Nested within a randomised controlled trial testing the effectiveness of arthritis gloves (Isotoner gloves versus loose-fitting placebo gloves) in people with RA and UIA, this qualitative study aimed to explore participants’ views on the impact of wearing arthritis gloves on their hand pain and function.
Methods: Semi-structured one-to-one interviews were conducted with purposively selected participants following 12-weeks of glove wear. Participants and the interviewer were blinded to the treatment allocation. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using thematic analysis.
Results: Participants (intervention n=10; control n=9) recruited from 13 NHS hospital sites in the UK participated in the interviews. Two main themes, with sub-themes, were elicited from the data: (1) Mechanisms determining glove use: ‘As soon as your joints get a bit warmer, the pain actually eases’ (thermal qualities; glove-use in daily activities; glove-use during sleep); and (2) Ambivalence about benefits of arthritis gloves: ‘I suppose a normal pair of gloves would do the same sort of thing?’ (are they a help or hindrance?; aesthetic appeal; future use of gloves).
Conclusion: Participants had ambivalent views on the impact of both the intervention and loose-fitting placebo gloves on their hand pain and function, identifying warmth as the main benefit. Ordinary mid-finger length gloves widely accessible from high street suppliers could deliver warmth and provide perceived benefits to hand pain and function.

Item Type: Article
Schools: Schools > School of Health and Society > Centre for Health Sciences Research
Journal or Publication Title: Rheumatology Advances in Practice
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISSN: 2514-1775
Related URLs:
Funders: National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Research for Patient Benefit
Depositing User: Dr Yeliz Prior
Date Deposited: 09 Feb 2022 08:50
Last Modified: 17 May 2022 14:15
URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/63136

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