Maimed wings and broken hearts : physical disability, social exclusion, and maternal love in Disney’s Maleficent and Maleficent: Mistress of Evil

Helm, H ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-1589-6642 2022, 'Maimed wings and broken hearts : physical disability, social exclusion, and maternal love in Disney’s Maleficent and Maleficent: Mistress of Evil' , in: Gender and female villains in 21st century fairy tale narratives : from evil queens to wicked witches , Emerald Studies in Popular Culture and Gender , Emerald, Bingley, pp. 177-190.

[img]
Preview
PDF - Accepted Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial 4.0.

Download (301kB) | Preview
[img] Microsoft Word - Accepted Version
Restricted to Repository staff only

Download (53kB)
Access Information: This author accepted manuscript is deposited under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial 4.0 International (CC BY-NC) licence. This means that anyone may distribute, adapt, and build upon the work for non-commercial purposes, subject to full attribution. If you wish to use this manuscript for commercial purposes, please contact permissions@emerald.com

Abstract

This chapter argues that Maleficent’s physical difference and social exclusion can be analysed as disabling rather than villainous trajectories in Maleficent (2014) and Maleficent: Mistress of Evil (2019). I explore how Maleficent is (re)represented in the twenty-first century as a more sympathetic figure who contends with disability and social prejudice in her attempt to form meaningful connections with others. I analyse Maleficent’s ‘villainous’ traits using Feminist Disability Studies (Garland-Thomson, 1997, 2017; Wendell, 1989) to argue that her physical and cultural differences invite hostility from the human kingdom, especially in relation to her maternal connection with Aurora. While critics have examined themes of disability and motherhood in Maleficent (Connelly, 2016; Wehler, 2019), I argue that these narratives are continued and subverted further in the sequel Maleficent: Mistress of Evil (2019). In re-visioning Maleficent in this way, it becomes possible to challenge narratives of female villainy by paying attention to physical disability, social exclusion, and maternal love.

Item Type: Book Section
Editors: Le Clue, N and Vermaak-Griessel, J
Schools: Schools > School of Arts & Media
Publisher: Emerald
Series Name: Emerald Studies in Popular Culture and Gender
ISBN: 9781801175654 (hardback); 9781801175647 (ebook)
Related URLs:
Depositing User: H Helm
Date Deposited: 17 Feb 2022 11:44
Last Modified: 17 Feb 2022 11:45
URI: https://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/63205

Actions (login required)

Edit record (repository staff only) Edit record (repository staff only)

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year