Maximising the health impacts of free advice services in the UK : a mixed methods systematic review

Young, DHJ ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9757-7006 and Bates, G ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6932-2372 2022, 'Maximising the health impacts of free advice services in the UK : a mixed methods systematic review' , Health and Social Care in the Community, 30 (5) , pp. 1713-1725.

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Abstract

After a decade of austerity spending cuts and welfare reform, the COVID‐19 pandemic has posed further challenges to the finances, health and wellbeing of working‐age, low‐income people. While advice services have been widely seen (and funded) as an income maximisation intervention, their health and well‐being impact is less clear. Previous systematic reviews investigating the link between advice services and health outcomes have found a weak evidence base and cover the period up until 2010. This mixed methods review examined up to date evidence to help understand the health impacts of free and independent welfare rights advice services. We included evaluations of free to access advice services on social welfare issues for members of the public that included health outcomes. Through comprehensive searches of two bibliographic databases and websites of relevant organisations we identified 15 articles based on a mixture of study designs. The advice interventions evaluated were based in a range of settings and only limited information was available on the delivery and nature of advice offered. We undertook a convergent synthesis to analyse data on the effectiveness of advice services on health outcomes and to explain variation in these outcomes. Our synthesis suggested that improvements in mental health and well‐being measures are commonly attributed to advice service interventions. However, there is little insight to explain these impacts or to inform the delivery of services that maximise health benefits. Co‐locating services in health settings appears promising and embracing models of delivery that promote collaboration between organisations tackling the social determinants of health may help to address the inherent complexities in the delivery of advice services and client needs. We make recommendations to improve routine monitoring and reporting by advice services, and methods of evaluation that will better account for complexity and context.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: ** Article version: VoR ** From Wiley via Jisc Publications Router ** Licence for VoR version of this article: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ **Journal IDs: issn 0966-0410; issn 1365-2524 **Article IDs: publisher-id: hsc13777 **History: published 21-03-2022; accepted 21-02-2022; rev-recd 28-01-2022; submitted 20-10-2021
Schools: Schools > School of Health and Society
Journal or Publication Title: Health and Social Care in the Community
Publisher: Wiley
ISSN: 0966-0410
Related URLs:
Funders: UK Research and Innovation
SWORD Depositor: Publications Router
Depositing User: Publications Router
Date Deposited: 24 Mar 2022 13:20
Last Modified: 06 Sep 2022 13:30
URI: https://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/63448

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