The effect of a heavy resisted sled-pull mesocycle on sprint performance in junior Australian football players.

Edwards, T ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6632-8274, Piggott, B, Banyard, HG ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6079-4020, Haff, G ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-0676-7750 and Joyce, C ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-0990-0876 2022, 'The effect of a heavy resisted sled-pull mesocycle on sprint performance in junior Australian football players.' , Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research .

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Abstract

This study assessed the effect of heavy resisted sled-pull training on sprint times and force, velocity, and power characteristics in junior Australian football players. Twenty-six athletes completed a 6-week resisted sled-pull training intervention which included 10 training sessions and 1-week taper. Instantaneous velocity during 2 maximal 30 m sprints was recorded 1 week before and 1 week after the intervention with a radar gun. Velocity-time data were used to derive sprint performance and force, velocity, and power characteristics. A paired t-test assessed the within-group differences between preintervention and postintervention testing. Statistical significance was accepted at p ≤ 0.05. Hedges' g effect sizes (ESs) were used to determine the magnitude of change in dependent variables. Maximum velocity (ES = 1.33) and sprint times at all distances (ES range 0.80-1.41) significantly improved after heavy resisted sled-pull training. This was reflected in sprint force, velocity, and power characteristics with significant improvements in relative theoretical force (ES = 0.63), theoretical velocity (ES = 0.99), relative maximum power (ES = 1.04), and ratio of horizontal to vertical force (ES = 0.99). Despite the multifactorial nature of training and competing physical demands associated with preseason training, these findings imply that a short, resisted sled-pull training mesocycle may improve sprint performance and underlying force, velocity, and power characteristics in junior athletes. [Abstract copyright: Copyright © 2022 National Strength and Conditioning Association.]

Item Type: Article
Schools: Schools > School of Health and Society
Journal or Publication Title: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research
Publisher: Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins
ISSN: 1533-4287
SWORD Depositor: Publications Router
Depositing User: Publications Router
Date Deposited: 11 Aug 2022 13:57
Last Modified: 11 Aug 2022 13:57
URI: https://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/63794

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