How does race work in social work education? Everyday racial logics, distinctions and practices in social work qualifying programmes in England.

Morton, JW ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-5096-7637, Jeyasingham, D, Vindegg, J and Fjeldheim, S 2022, 'How does race work in social work education? Everyday racial logics, distinctions and practices in social work qualifying programmes in England.' , The British Journal of Social Work .

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Abstract

This article presents findings from a study which explored the everyday ways race works on social work programmes in England. The study focused on how race was spoken about and conceptualised, how people were categorised and ordered according to race and the social interactions where race was understood by participants to be significant. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with eight social work lecturers and nineteen black social work students at two universities in England, to explore the following topics: classroom-based and practice learning, assessment and feedback, interactions between students and between students and educators, and university and practice agency cultures. Data were analysed using thematic analysis and the following themes identified: the routine interpellation of black students and communities in terms of absolute cultural differences, black students’ everyday experiences of marginalisation, hostility and othering, and the racialisation of black students in judgements made about their academic and practice performance. The article concludes that social work education must engage more deeply with contemporary theorisations of race and culture, and that social work educators need a reflexive understanding of how notions such as diversity, equality and universal academic standards are put into practice in ways that marginalise and devalue black students.

Item Type: Article
Schools: Schools > School of Health and Society > Centre for Applied Research in Health, Welfare and Policy
Journal or Publication Title: The British Journal of Social Work
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISSN: 0045-3102
Funders: BRITISH ASSOCIATION OF SOCIAL WORK: INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT FUND, Norwegian Union of Social Educators and Social Workers (FO) Professional scholarship for Social Workers.
Depositing User: JW Morton
Date Deposited: 25 Jul 2022 12:45
Last Modified: 25 Jul 2022 12:45
URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/64217

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