Identifying the health, wellbeing and social impacts in older adults using nature-based projects: a case study of care farming and community gardening interventions in Greater Manchester.

Mitchell, L ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-8611-0806 2021, Identifying the health, wellbeing and social impacts in older adults using nature-based projects: a case study of care farming and community gardening interventions in Greater Manchester. , PhD thesis, The University of Salford.

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Abstract

Urbanisation and the continued increase in global populations has created pressures on resources, including health care and natural ecosystems. Subsequently, longer life expectancies and comorbidities exacerbates pressures on health services. The Global North faces ageing populations and long-term health conditions, illustrating a need for innovation. It is acknowledged that Green Infrastructure (GI), which incorporates nature within built environments, could provide a health solution in the form of nature- based interventions (NBIs). While NBI’s have been growing in number and popularity, evaluation about the impact is still needed. Existing geographic literature concentrates on younger populations, abroad and across (semi) rural wealthy locations: while health studies the mentally ill, isolated older people, care settings, or those with chronic long- term conditions. This thesis has explored the use of GI for the benefit and improvement to human health and wellbeing. The thesis aimed ‘to critically explore urban NBIs, such as care farms (CF) and community gardens (CG), in Greater Manchester (GM), to ascertain their value for the older populations and its role within the wider green movement’. Using in-depth semi-structured interviews with ten older adults, based within case studies and other stakeholder interviews provides a comprehensive investigation of benefits. Findings signify these sites make older adults feel ‘happier, healthier and connected’, with the motivating factor for attendance being socialisation, while health and wellbeing improved as a biproduct. These include feeling valuable and included, and reduced thoughts of anxiety and isolation. With a pandemic illustrating their resilience and resourcefulness. While impacts were evidenced by outsiders, voicing perspectives of acceptance and sustainability, as they articulated aesthetic improvements and community cohesion. This research provides unique insights into the impact and influence that CFs and CGs have specifically for older adults, and indirect benefits from GI. Thus, enhancing the science base, and facilitating recommendations for future practice and research.

Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
Contributors: Hardman, M (Supervisor), Howarth, M (Supervisor) and Cook, P (Supervisor)
Schools: Schools > School of Environment and Life Sciences
Funders: The University Alliance
Depositing User: Miss Louise Mitchell
Date Deposited: 02 Aug 2022 08:03
Last Modified: 02 Aug 2022 08:03
URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/64444

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