Reduction in transfer of micro-organisms between patients and staff using short-sleeved gowns and hand/arm hygiene in intensive care during the COVID-19 pandemic: A simulation-based randomised trial

Vincent, L ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-0168-4734, Ibrahim, M ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6345-1533, Kitchin, J, Pickering, C, Wilson, J, Sorrentino, E, Salvagno, C, Earl, L ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9979-4637, Ma, L, Simpson, K, Baker, R and McCulloch, P 2022, 'Reduction in transfer of micro-organisms between patients and staff using short-sleeved gowns and hand/arm hygiene in intensive care during the COVID-19 pandemic: A simulation-based randomised trial' , Journal of the Intensive Care Society .

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Abstract

Background Current personal protective equipment (PPE) practices in UK intensive care units involve “sessional” use of long-sleeved gowns, risking nosocomial infection transmitted via gown sleeves. Data from the first wave of the COVID19 pandemic demonstrated that these changes in infection prevention and control protocols were associated with an increase in healthcare associated bloodstream infections. We therefore explored the use of a protocol using short-sleeved gowns with hand and arm hygiene to reduce this risk. Methods ICU staff were trained in wearing short-sleeved gowns and using a specific hand and arm washing technique between patients (experimental protocol). They then underwent simulation training, performing COVID-19 intubation and proning tasks using either experimental protocol or the standard (long-sleeved) control protocol. Fluorescent powder was used to simulate microbial contamination, detected using photographs under ultraviolet light. Teams were randomised to use control or experimental PPE first. During the simulation, staff were questioned on their feelings about personal safety, comfort and patient safety. Results Sixty-eight staff and 17 proning volunteers were studied. Experimental PPE completely prevented staff contamination during COVID-19 intubation, whereas this occurred in 30/67 staff wearing control PPE ( p = .003, McNemar). Proning volunteers were contaminated by staff in 15/17 control sessions and in 1/17 with experimental PPE ( p = .023 McNemar). Staff comfort was superior with experimental PPE ( p< .001, Wilcoxon). Their personal safety perception was initially higher with control PPE, but changed towards neutrality during sessions ( p < .001 start, 0.068 end). Their impressions of patient safety were initially similar ( p = .87), but finished strongly in favour of experimental PPE ( p < .001). Conclusions Short-sleeved gowns with hand and forearm cleansing appear superior to sessional long-sleeved gowns in preventing cross-contamination between staff and patients.

Item Type: Article
Schools: Schools > Salford Business School
Journal or Publication Title: Journal of the Intensive Care Society
Publisher: The Intensive Care Society
ISSN: 1751-1437
Funders: Oxford University
SWORD Depositor: Publications Router
Depositing User: Publications Router
Date Deposited: 09 Sep 2022 09:54
Last Modified: 09 Sep 2022 09:54
URI: https://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/64645

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