‘All avatars aren’t we’: football and the experience of football-themed digital content during a global pandemic

Crawford, G ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7499-3864, Fenton, A ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6102-6288, Chadwick, S and Lawrence, S 2021, '‘All avatars aren’t we’: football and the experience of football-themed digital content during a global pandemic' , International Review for the Sociology of Sport . (In Press)

[img]
Preview
PDF - Accepted Version
Download (232kB) | Preview
Access Information: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article which is due to be published in International Review for the Sociology of Sport (IRSS). Users who receive access to an article through a repository are reminded that the article is protected by copyright and reuse is restricted to non-commercial and no derivative uses. Users may also download and save a local copy of an article accessed in an institutional repository for the user's personal reference.

Abstract

This paper explores the contemporary nature of association football consumption. In particular, we argue that the Covid-19 pandemic reveals the contemporary and particular nature of the relationship between football and its supporters, which is increasingly focused on the consumption of themed digital participatory experiences. During this pandemic, what fans missed was not only live football, but also the sporting ‘experience’ and the opportunities for participation that this provides. Hence, here we saw fans, clubs, and media providers employing new digital technologies to create themed experiences that facilitated (and mediated) participation and interaction. Following Žižek (2014) we suggest that the Covid-19 pandemic can be understood as a global mega event that creates a seismic, reality alerting schism, whose aftermath requires new ontologies and theories. Our response is to utilise a number of key and illustrative examples and to offer a new synthesis of theories and literatures, most notably, on the experience society, theming, participatory culture, neoliberalism, and most significantly, digital culture. This new context and (re)combination of theories then provides a new, and essential, perspective that reveals a great deal about the contemporary nature of the sport, what fans buy into, and also, how this may change post pandemic.

Item Type: Article
Schools: Schools > School of Health and Society > Centre for Applied Research in Health, Welfare and Policy
Journal or Publication Title: International Review for the Sociology of Sport
Publisher: SAGE Publications
ISSN: 1012-6902
Depositing User: G Crawford
Date Deposited: 13 May 2021 12:41
Last Modified: 13 May 2021 12:41
URI: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/60276

Actions (login required)

Edit record (repository staff only) Edit record (repository staff only)

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year